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Finding-Aid for the Howard Bahr Collection (MUM00014)

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Descriptive Summary
PURL:
http://purl.oclc.org/umarchives/MUM00014/
Creator:
Bahr, Howard
Title:
Howard Bahr Collection.
Inclusive Dates:
1987
Materials in:
English
Abstract:
Collection consists of a single document related to Howard Bahr's Home for Christmas: A Story of the South written in 1987.
Quantity:
1 box.
Number:
MUM00014
Location:
B-9.
Repository :
The University of Mississippi
J.D. Williams Library
Department of Archives and Special Collections
P.O. Box 1848, University, MS 38677-1848, USA
Phone: 662.915.7408
Fax: 662.915.5734
E-Mail: archive@olemiss.edu
URL: http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/general_library/archives/
Cite as:
Howard Bahr Collection (MUM00014). The Department of Archives and Special Collections, J.D. Williams Library, The University of Mississippi.

Biographical Note
citation: http://www.starkville.lib.ms.us/StarkvilleReadsoct.html
Howard Bahr was born in Meridian, Mississippi, in 1946. As a child, he realized his natural proclivity for writing and his love of reading. Listening to the tales of his grandfather, he developed an interest in the Civil War and the old South.After his high school graduation in 1964, Bahr entered the United States Navy, where he served four years. After being released from the Navy in 1968, Bahr worked on the Gulf Coast Railroad for five years. In 1973, Howard Bahr entered the University of Mississippi in Oxford as a twenty-seven year old freshman. There he received both a Bachelor's and a Master's degree in English and served as the curator of Rowan Oak, the home of Mississippi writer William Faulkner from 1976 to 1993. He was an also instructor of literature at Ole Miss as well as a re-enactor of the Civil War. In August of 1993 he accepted a job at Motlow State Community College in Tullahoma, Tennessee, where he currently teaches English as an assistant professor. Bahr published his first novel, The Black Flower: A Novel of the Civil War, in 1998. The beautifully written novel about an ordinary soldier during the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, was nominated for The Stephen Crane Award from Book-of-the-Month Club, The Lincoln Prize from Gettysburg College, and The LSU Michael Shaara Award for Civil War First Fiction. It was also nominated for The Sue Kaufman First Fiction Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In addition, the novel was chosen as both a Book-of-the-Month Club and a Quality Paperback Book alternate. Bahr's second book, The Year of the Jubilo, published in 2000, is also a novel about the Civil War. A short book, Home for Christmas, written for children, is a tale about two small children finding some happiness and a new home during the difficult Post Civil war days. The Black Flower was a New York Times Notable Book and received the Harold D. Vursell Memorial Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His second novel, The Year of Jubilo, was also a New York Times Notable Book. A new book The Judas Field: A Novel of the Civil War will be released July 25, 2006.Howard Bahr resides in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

Scope and Contents Note
Collection consists of a single document related to Howard Bahr's Home for Christmas: A Story of the South written in 1987.

Restrictions
Access Restrictions
Open.
Use Restriction
The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use", that user may be liable for copyright infringement.

Container List


TD. October 1987. Prospectus for Bahr's 1987 publication Home for Christmas: A Story of the South . (#2000-85).