Finding Aid for the General Wirt Adams Collection

MUM00755

PURL

http://purl.oclc.org/umarchives/MUM00755/

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Summary Information

Repository
University of Mississippi Libraries
Creator
Wirt, Adams, 1852-1914
Title
General Wirt Adams Collection
ID
MUM00755
Date [bulk]
Bulk, 1861-1888
Date [inclusive]
1855-1925
Extent
6.0 Linear feet 3 boxes + 1 oversize
Language of Materials
English
Abstract
Collection of papers relating primarily to the life and military career of General William Wirt Adams. Bulk of collection consists of Civil War era correspondence and documents collected in two scrapbooks by Adams following 1865.

Preferred Citation

General Wirt Adams Collection, (MUM00755), Archives and Special Collections, J.D. Williams Library, The University of Mississippi

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Biographical Note

William Wirt Adams was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, on 22 March 1819. His family relocated to Natchez, Mississippi, in 1825. Following his graduation in 1839 from Bardstown College in Kentucky, Adams enlisted in the Texas militia. He returned to Mississippi and married Sallie Huger Mayarant in 1850. Adams worked as a banker and planter in Vicksburg, MS, and Jackson, MS, and served in the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1858 to 1860. Adams worked as a Confederate commissioner from Mississippi to Louisiana to encourage that state to secede from the Union. After Mississippi’s secession from the United States in 1861, Adams formed the “Wirt Adams” Cavalry Regiment in Memphis, Tennessee. The unit eventually became the 1st Mississippi Cavalry. Adams served as colonel of the regiment after being promoted in October of 1861. His forces fought in Nashville, Tennessee and Corinth, Mississippi. The regiment also participated in the Battle of Shiloh on April 6, 1862. Adams’ brother Daniel also fought at Shiloh with his 1st Louisiana Infantry regiment. Daniel Weisiger Adams eventually earned the rank of brigadier general in the Confederate Army. William Wirt Adams’ next assignment involved protecting local plantations around Vicksburg from federal forces. After the fall of Vicksburg in 1863, Adams and his men attempted to stop Union General William Tecumseh Sherman’s Meridian campaign of 1864. Adams’ final months in the Civil War passed under the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest in Alabama. Adams’ brigade surrendered in Sumter County, Alabama on 4 May1865. Following the Civil War, Adams returned to Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi. He was appointed state revenue agent in 1880 and postmaster of Jackson by President Grover Cleveland in 1885. Adams died on 1 May 1888 after an encounter with John Martin, editor of the New Mississippian, in the streets of Jackson that left both men dead of gunshot wounds. Adams had confronted Martin for publishing articles critical of him. Adams is buried in Greenwood Cemetery in Jackson.

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Scope and Content

Contains the wartime papers and some post-war material of Brigadier General William Wirt Adams, known now as the Gen. Wirt Adams Collection. These papers were initially given to his son Wirt Adams then passed to his daughter Norvelle Adams Beard. They were then passed to Mrs. Beard’s daughter, Norvelle Beard Lambdin and then to her daughter Ann Lambdin Young. Donated along with the Bisland-Lambdin Collection by Ann Lambdin Young and R. James Young to the University of Mississippi’s Department of Archives & Special Collections.

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Arrangement

Two scrapbooks in individual boxes, followed by a box containing a collection of loose materials originally found in the scrapbooks, processed to match their original order, as well as other loose documents and newspaper clippings. Oversized box contains larger documents and newspaper pages arranged by date.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Mississippi Libraries

Revision Description

  2017

Access Restrictions

Due to preservation concerns, patrons are requested to consult the Special Collections staff before requesting materials.

Copyright Restrictions

The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement.

Additions

No further additions are expected to this collection.

Acquisition Information

Donated by Ann Lambdin Young and R. James Young

Processing Information

Collection processed by Jennifer Ford and Sarah Parrish.

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Related Materials

Related Materials at the University of Mississippi

Winfield Scott Featherston Collection; 17th Mississippi Infantry Regiment Manuscript; E.V. Adams Collection; William Atwood Reconstruction Documents; Lionel Baxter Collection; J.A. Bigger Diary; Clark Family Collection; Charles Dean Collection; Absalom West Collection; W.E. Duncan Letters; Professor J.G. Dupree Reminiscences; William Spencer Hudson Manuscript.

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Controlled Access Headings

Function(s)

  • Education--United States--History--19th century

Geographic Name(s)

  • Mississippi -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Mississippi -- Politics and government
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865

Subject(s)

  • Domestic relations -- Mississippi
  • Legislators -- United States

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Collection Inventory

Box 1: Scrapbook 1 1861-1887 

Scope and Content

Scrapbook containing original correspondence, newspaper clippings, and epherma collected by General Wirt Adams

1.1: Letter from Earl Van Dorn, signed “Van Dorn” to “Dear Col” [Wirt Adams], 18 April 1861 

Scope and Content

“Star of the West.” 1p. Letter written the day Earl Van Dorn (then Colonel Van Dorn) captured the federal transport ship, “The Star of the West.”

1.2: Letter from Jefferson Davis to “Hon Wirt Adams”, 11 June 1861 

Scope and Content

Richmond, VA. 1p. Reply to Wirt Adams’ request to raise and independent regiment of mounted riflemen [later known as the “Wirt Adams Cavalry Regiment”]. Davis granted this request but denied Adams’ request regarding an independent command. Davis ends the letter with the prophetic line, “constant occupation and uncertainty of the future prevented a reply to a former letter.”

1.3: Letter from W.J. Hardee [Brigadier General William Joseph Hardee] to Wirt Adams [then Colonel located in Jackson, MS], 18 September 1861 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs. Upper Dist, Arkansas, Pitmans Ferry. Jackson, MS. 2pp. Re: In receipt of information from Major General Polk that “he has been requested to the command of the Military operations in Arkansas and Missouri.” Polk asked Hardee to move his command to the Mississippi River. Hardee asked Adams to bring his cavalry to accompany him into Kentucky, “with as little delay as practicable.” Hardee indicates that he is currently “deficient in cavalry and your regiment will be a most …valuable and acceptable acquisition."

1.4: Pasted-in newspaper clipping with a pencil notation, possibly by General Wirt Adams, “from the Mississippian, Jackson, MS 28th June ’64”, [28 June 1864] 

Scope and Content

1p. The article describes Jefferson Davis’ authorization for the enlistment of a “Regiment of Mounted Men” by “Wirt Adams, Esq.” The article describes the likely use of this regiment for guerilla engagements, “the command…would always be on the march, participating in all important engagements within their reach, traversing long distances and striking unexpected blows, reconnoitering the frontiers of the enemy and impeding his advance at critical junctures.” The article goes on to praise Adams, “we do not know one better qualified to lead such a command than Wirt Adams. Having seen service, he will join the advantages of actual experience to the coolness, daring, courage, and love of adventure of as brave a knight as ever shivered lance.”

1.5: Pasted-in unidentified newspaper clipping with a penciled notation, possibly by General Wirt Adams, “A notice of the services of the Regt during the occupation of Corinth by our army.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

1p. This newspaper reprinted an account found in an earlier article in the Vicksburg, Whig. The article notes, “Wirt Adams’ Cavalry Regiment—We learn from a gentleman recently from Corinth that the cavalry regiment commanded by Col. Wirt Adams has greatly distinguished itself in recent operations in the neighborhood of Corinth.” Same page as 1.6 and 1.7.

1.6: Letter from W.J. Hardee [Brigadier General William Joseph Hardee] to “My dear Colonel” [Col. Wirt Adams], 22 April 1862 

Scope and Content

Corinth, [MS]. 1p. Requesting then Colonel Adams to send Lieutenant Bondurant [likely Albert Bondurant] to another general [illegible name]. Asks Adams to contact him without delay. Same page as 1.5 and 1.7.

1.7: Special Orders No. 37. Hd. Qrs. A.M., Tupelo, Miss., 11 June 1862 

Scope and Content

1p. Re: Notes the granting of a leave of absence for Col. Wirt Adams, by command of Gen. Bragg. Signed Geo. G. [Garren], AAG. Same page as 1.5 and 1.6.

1.8: Telegram from Braxton Bragg to Col. Wirt Adams, 20 June 1862 

Scope and Content

Tupelo, [MS]. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. 1p. Bragg notes that in the absence of General Beauregard that he “cannot leave this Army” and that General Van Dorn was leaving that day to take command at Jackson. Bragg noted that 10,000 men were being sent to Oxford and he would reach them on the 21st. He ended by saying, “they ought to defend both roads & recapture Memphis.”

1.9: Report from Wirt Adams, Col. Comdg. to “General”, 12 July 1862 

Scope and Content

Headquarters of Reg. near Saltillo, [MS]. 9pp. Penciled notation, written by General Adams at a later date describes the content of the report. The notation reads “The foregoing Report of the fight near Booneville Miss deserves notice as the famous Genl Phil Sheridan, then a Col Major Command at Booneville & sent the Regiment to our war [illegible words] and made the attack in which it [occurred] such rough [handling]. On its [precipitous] flight it [two illegible words] pursued by Capt. Harrison and [illegible word] escaped captives. It’s amusing to read in the “Life of Lt. Genl. Phil Sheridan” by some northern [two illegible words], the false & exaggerated account of the affair. W.H.” Several pages distinctly faded, almost to illegibility.

1.10: Report from Capt. Isaac F. Harrison [Captain, Co. A, Wirt Adams Cavalry] to Col. Wirt Adams, “Commanding ‘Wirt Adams Cav.’, Camp Saltillo, Miss.”, 10 July 1862 

Scope and Content

Head Quarters Tensas Cavalry, Camp Saltillo. 4pp. Pages split in the center. Penciled notation, likely written by General Adams at a later date relates to this report. It reads “The three following Reports of Capt. Isaac Harrison & Capt. W.R. Luckett and Capt. Geo. Barnes relate to the same affair near Booneville Miss- see my report proceeding.

1.11: Report from Capt. Geo Barnes to “Dear Colonel” [Col. Wirt Adams], 10 July 1862 

Scope and Content

“In camp near Salltillo.” Penciled notation, likely written by General Adams at a later date relates to this report. It reads “The three following Reports of Capt. Isaac Harrison & Capt. W.R. Luckett and Capt. Geo. Barnes relate to the same affair near Booneville Miss- see my report proceeding.

1.12: Report from W.R. Luckett, Capt Comdg 5th Squadron” to “Col. Wirt Adms, Comdg.”, 12 July 1862 

Scope and Content

“Camp near Saltillo, Miss.” 3pp. Penciled notation, likely written by General Adams at a later date relates to this report. It reads “The three following Reports of Capt. Isaac Harrison & Capt. W.R. Luckett and Capt. Geo. Barnes relate to the same affair near Booneville Miss- see my report proceeding."

1.13: Post-war reminiscence, likely by General Wirt Adams, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

3pp. Describes the “hottest place my Regt. got into during the War.” This place was Britton’s Lane in West Tennessee and the engagement took place in the summer of 1862. The author, likely Adams, ends by writing, “my own escape from injury was quite a miracle.”

1.14: “Notes of the War, No. 2.”, [date unkown] 

Scope and Content

3pp. A post-war reminiscence, likely by General Adams. This account describes his position as Earl Van Dorn made his “attack on Corinth.” The author, likely Adams, relates that he was left at Davis’ Bridge on the [Hatchie] River and goes on to describe what seems to be an initial encounter before the Battle of Davis’ Bridge.

1.15: Letter from W.J. Hardee [Brigadier General William Joseph Hardee] to “My Dear Col” [Colonel Wirt Adams], 27 August 1862 

Scope and Content

Chattanooga, Tenn. 3pp. Describes action in Kentucky and relates that the Federal forces have fallen back to Bridgeport. He describes driving his forces “into the heart of Kentucky” and notes that his men are “resolved to conquer or die.” He gives Adams his best wishes and hopes he is not “idle” under Price [General Sterling Price].

1.16: Report from Wirt Adams, Col. Comdg to “Capt. DW Floweree” [AAG to Brigadier General DH Maury], 25 September 1862 

Scope and Content

Headquarters Cavalry, Maury’s Division. 3pp. Marked “Copy.” Describing action of his regiment at the Battle of Iuka, MS.

1.17: Letter from Brigadier General Dabney H. Maury to “My Dear Colonel” [Colonel Wirt Adams], 15 October 1862 

Scope and Content

Head Quarters Maury’s Division. 1p. Relates his dismay that Colonel Adams and his regiment have been transferred to “a distant field of operations.” Maury noted, “I know that your duties have been performed with energy, courage, fidelity and success.” Same page as 1.18.

1.18: Letter from RR. Hutchinson, AAG to Col. Wirt Adams, Comdg. Cavalry, 17 April 1863 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs. Grand Gulf. 1p. Penciled in notation, likely written by General Adams at a later date,” reads “Relating to Grierson’s Raid.” Hutchinson relates a dispatch from General Pemberton which reads, “the raid of the enemy is reported three miles west of Westville last night, it is possible they may be making for Hazlehurst and Grand Gulf to fall on your rear.” Hutchinson notes that Adams is requested to send a large body of scouts on the roads around Hazlehurst. Same page as 1.17.

1.19: Letter from RR. Hutchinson, AAG, to Col Wirt Adams, Comdg. Cavalry, by order of Genl Bowen, 27 April 1863 

Scope and Content

Grand Gulf, [MS]. 1p. Penciled in notation, likely written by General Adams at a later date,” reads “Griersons Raid.” Relates another dispatch from Pemberton asking that they, “collect Wirt Adams Cavalry and send them out to meet the enemy which were at 12 o’clock to day at Hazlehurst. Follow them up without delay and annoy and ambush them if possible.”

1.20: Letter from FM Stafford, AAG [to Major General JB Pemberton at the time] to Col. Wirt Adams, Comdg. Cavalry, 18 May 1863 [penciled in] 

Scope and Content

Vicksburg, Miss. 1p. Relates orders that as troops were being ordered out of Snyder’s Mills, Adams’ cavalry was to cut off the enemy’s supplies at night. Stafford notes that Pemberton, “expects great assistance from you in the defense of this place.”

1.21: Letter from W.J. Hardee [General William Joseph Hardee] to “My Dear Colonel” [Colonel Wirt Adams], 27 July 1863 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs near Morton. 4pp. Written in response to a letter from Adams. Hardee relates his dismay at being transferred to his new command over the Army of the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. He wrote, “I came here under the orders of the government and without any solicitation on my part. From all I see and know I fear I may not be able to do all I could [illegible]. Genl Johnston is absent for a few days at Mobile and in his absence I have assumed command. When he returns I suppose he will assign me to some duty. I did not come here willingly. I would have preferred to remain with my old [comdg] and I have seen nothing since my arrival to change that opinion.” Hardee went on to regret Adams’ removal from his command as well as what he saw as the “neglect of the government in not rewarding your [Adams’] services.” Hardee noted that he was glad Adams’ family and his slaves were safe and related that he was on the move to Enterprise, [MS].

1.22: Broadside from Lieutenant General W.J. Hardee, 28 August 1863 

Scope and Content

Enterprise, Mississippi. 1p. Relates that he has assumed “command of the paroled prisoners of Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Texas and Louisiana, recently forming a part of the garrisons of Vicksburg and Port Hudson.” He outlined the place of rendezvous for the paroled prisoners at Enterprise, MS. Hardee entreats the soldiers, “Soldiers! Look at your country- the earth ravaged- property carried away, or disappearing in flame and ashes- the people murdered- the negroes arrayed in arms against the whites- cruel indignities inflicted upon women and children…Fellow soldiers! There is but one path to follow. It leads to the camp. Come to your color[s] and stand beside your comrades, who, with heroic constancy; are confronting the enemy.”

1.23: Letter from W.J. Hardee [General William Joseph Hardee] to “His Excellency President Davis” [Jefferson Davis], 17 September 1863 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs. Enterprise, Miss. “For Col. Wirt Adams.” 1p. A letter of recommendation for Wirt Adams’ promotion to Brigadier General.

1.24: Letter from W.J. Hardee [General William Joseph Hardee] to “My Dear Colo” [Colonel Wirt Adams], 17 September 1863 

Scope and Content

Enterprise, Miss. 1p. Hardee relates that he has just written to Jefferson Davis, “in your behalf. I trust it will secure your promotion.” Hardee notes that he is looking forward to seeing Adams at Demopolis, [AL].

1.25: Pasted-in newspaper clipping, with penciled in notations, likely by Wirt Adams at a later date, which read, “from Charleston, SC Mercury, 3 Oct ’63”, [3 October 1863] 

Scope and Content

1p. A notice of promotions to the rank of Brigadier General. The clipping lists the promotion of Wirt Adams to Brigadier General.

1.26: Telegram from Jefferson Davis to General Wirt Adams, 5 [month unlisted] 1863 

Scope and Content

Richmond, [VA]. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. 2pp. Discussed a letter written by General Adams which has resulted in General S.D. Lee’s communicating with General Smith. Davis advises that it “would be well for you to send a discreet officer to give to Genl. Smith any information contained in your letter as to the practicality of crossing the River.”

1.27: Letter from W.H. Jackson to “Col. Wirt Adams, near Brownsville”, 15 October 1863 [penciled in] 

Scope and Content

Livingston. 2pp. Congratulates Adams on his promotion to Brigadier General. Describes the impending action at Chattanooga and notes the differences between General’s Rosecrans and Bragg. According to Jackson, Rosecrans is “too wily” for Bragg.

1.28: Letter from [JL Yerger] to “My Dear Col” [Wirt Adams], 7 November 1863 

Scope and Content

Ararat [VA?]. 4pp. Discusses a statement by Adams where he related wanting to bring “a Brigade to this part of the country.” Yerger advises that “this time has past now” and describes the pillage taking place in the area. He congratulates Adams on his promotion.

1.29: Letter from Lt. [illegible word, possibly Addison Harvey, First Lieutenant of Company M] to “Col” [Wirt Adams], 6 November 1863 

Scope and Content

“Camp near Brownsville, Miss.” 4pp. Report apparently written at the request of General Adams. Notes encounters with armed slaves on the plantation of Jefferson Davis and his brother Joseph Davis. The letter’s author writes that Adams directed him to take 20 men, cross the Big Black River, and destroy the ship Indianola. The ship was not destroyed but he learned there were “sixty armed negroes on the Joe Davis Place, engaged in seizing & carrying off to the Yankees…plundering the adjoining plantations & committing other acts of a similar character.” He “determined to cross the river and capture or kill them.” The author describes killing at least eight former slaves during this process and wounding several others. He mentions two African-American men by name, “Capt. Horace” and “Capt. Henry.”

1.30: General Orders, No. 1. Wirt Adams, Brig. Genl., 14 November 1863 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Cavalry Brigade, Near Gallatin, [MS]. Adams relates his promotion and command of the brigade. He wrote, “We are engaged in, fellow soldiers, in no ordinary contest. It involves for us, our lives, liberty & property & the protection of our family hearths, from the polluting presence of a brutal & malignant foe.” He noted, “in this struggle we suffer the disadvantage of greatly inferior numbers & resources & can only hope to [illegible] success by superior valor, constancy & discipline.” He also interestingly noted [possibly in reaction to the report of 6 November], “whilst promoting by every means [in] our power of inflicting injury upon our enemies, let us, at the same time, be careful not to increase the already heavy losses of the citizens of our country."

1.31: Letter from Lt. [illegible word, possibly Addison Harvey, First Lieutenant of Company M] to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 27 December [1863] 

Scope and Content

Camp near Brownsville, [MS]. 2pp. Relates receiving orders from General Jackson to “turn over to Mr. J[E] Davis all the animals captured by me on his plantation.” The lieutenant notes that the animals had already been dispersed and many sold. He noted that “with considerable trouble I was able to furnish Mr. Davis a list of the names of persons who bought or now have the mules &c, with the brand. None of them except a mule & a roan pony have his mark.” Apparently Davis wished all animals found on the plantation restored to him, and this caused the Lieutenant some discomfort. He ended by writing, “I merely write this to show you that I have already made an effort to restore Mr. Davis’ property which ought to satisfy any reasonable man.” There is no mention of the attack on the African Americans on the plantation by the troops, or reference to those captured or killed.

1.32: Letter from Geo. Moorman, Capt. AA General [AAG at the time to General WH Jackson] to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 24 November 1863 

Scope and Content

Hd Qrs “Jacksons Cav Div.” Livingston, Miss. 1p. Moorman relates that General Adams is ordered by General Jackson to “get everything in fighting time & hold your command in readiness for the movement he spoke to you about. You will be telegraphed when to start.”

1.33: Post-war reminiscence regarding Wirt Adams’ involvement with a contemplated attack on New Orleans, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Adams copies out a dispatch he sent to Thomas L. Jackson, AA. General to General Polk. The penciled reminiscence by Adams, likely written at a later date, reads “At the time Genl. Jackson contemplated attacking New Orleans, Genl Polk ordered me to make a diversion in his favor by approaching & threatening Port Hudson & Bayou Sara and to get reliable information regarding the garrison of their places. The following is a copy of the dispatch sent Genl. Polk from Olive Branch near Baton Rouge.” The dispatch itself relates the information Adams found during this operation regarding the defenses at Baton Rouge and Port Hudson.

1.34: Two documents pasted onto 1 scrapbook page. “Report of Effective Strength and Loss of Horses from Adams’ Brig ‘JC [D]- for Febry 7th 1864” and “Informal Report of Casualties in Adams’ Brig. ‘JCD’ in the action of Feby 4th & 5th 1864.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Likely relates to the action seen by Adams’ Brigade in the Meridian Campaign, February 3-28, 1864.

1.35: Newspaper clipping attached to scrapbook page with pins. The Mississippian, [March 1864] 

Scope and Content

1p. One article in particular titled, “First Justitia,” written under the penname “Jacob Jarvis” relates the experience by a soldier in Wirt Adams’ brigade during the Meridian Campaign. Note: A penciled-in notation, likely written by General Adams’ at a later date, seems to identify Capt. Robert Muldrow as the author.

1.36: Letter from 18 “neighbors and family” to Brig Gen Wirt Adams, 5 March 1864 

Scope and Content

Jackson, [MS]. 3pp. Requests that Adams and his “gallant Brigade” meet with the undersigned so that they could convey “their thanks for the distinguished valor displayed in resisting the advance of the enemy from Big Black.”

1.37: Letter from William [last name obscured by pasted pages but likely Elliott], AAG to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 16 March 1864 

Scope and Content

Head Quarters Lee’s Cav. Dept. Canton, Miss. 2pp. Alerts Adams that as General Lee would soon be departing from the area, Adams will be assuming command of the line “from Grenada down to Natchez.” He was directed to pay special attention to the “section bordering on the Yazoo River, which the enemy may attempt to take possession of for the purpose of procuring provisions.” It was also noted that soldiers were no longer permitted to travel inside the enemy’s lines: “it is especially desirable that all intercourse between citizens and the enemy should cease and you will adopt the necessary measures for effecting this object. No permits to go within the enemy’s lines will be granted to citizens except in the most extreme cases.” Adams was also ordered to destroy all articles obtained through trade with the enemy and to closely watch the Central Railroad.

1.38 & 1.39: Letter from William Elliott, AAG, to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 16 March 1864 

Scope and Content

Head Quarters. Lees Cav Dept. Canton, Miss. 2pp. References enclosed letter from “Department Head Quarters” which authorized General Lee to buy supplies with government cotton. Lee wanted Adams to give permission for the mayor of Jackson to use a few bales of government cotton to buy medical supplies for the residents of that city. Adams was also asked to make arrangements to buy medical supplies for Lee’s command with government cotton. Attached document contains a copy of Lee’s authorization to allow this, dated 14 February 1864.

1.40: Extract from General Orders, No. 32, 4 April 1864 

Scope and Content

Hd Qdqrs. Lee’s Cav. Dept. Canton, [MS]. 2pp. Among other things notes that Brigadier General Wirt Adams was assuming command of the department during the absence of the Major General [SD Lee].

1.41: Letter from Brigadier General Wirt Adams to President Davis [Jefferson Davis], 25 April 1864 

Scope and Content

Canton, Miss. 1p. Describes the capture of the US navy gunboat Petrel “captured by my command on the Yazoo River” and offers the spoils to the Confederate government. Adams writes, “It affords me cordial satisfaction to make this small but possibly useful contribution to an arm of the service which, with means so disproportionate has achieved results so important & beneficial to our Country & Cause.”

1.42: Letter from Frank Buchanan, Admiral, to Brig. Gen’l Wirt Adams, 27 April 1864 

Scope and Content

On Naval Commandant’s Office, Mobile, Ala. letterhead. 1p. Alerts Adams that Act’g Master James McCarrick will soon be arriving in Brandon, MS to “receive and convey to Selma, Ala, the eight heavy brass guns lately captured by the gallant forces under your command from the U.S. Steamer “Petrel” in the Yazoo River.” He ends the letter by writing, “I sincerely hope these guns may render service in our just cause against the vile enemy from whom they were captured.”

1.43: Letter from Dabney H. Maury [Major General] to “My Dear General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 14 [May] 1864 

Scope and Content

Labeled “Confidential.” 1p. Requests that Adams approach Senator Oldham of Texas to dissuade him from his notion to oppose “passage of Troops form Trans Mississippi to this Department.” Maury notes that Oldham is a “very clever man tenacious of purpose” and cautions Adams that “this is …a delicate business.” He asks Adams to decide whether to approach Oldham or “whether it will be wise to attempt it at all.”

1.44: Letter from Major General S.D. Lee to “General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 18 May 1864 

Scope and Content

Head Qrs, Dept. Ala, Miss, & E. La. Meridian, [MS]. 2pp. References telegram from Adams to him relating the information that federal troops were in and around Yazoo City, with an expectation of continuing to Vicksburg. Lee offers to send Gholson’s Brigade “recently mustered with the Confederate service” to Adams in a few days to supplement his small force. Lee writes, “with this addition to your force You will then be able I hope to cope with the raiding parties of the Enemy and to restore confidence.” He writes about his inability to greatly increase forces in central Mississippi: “it is necessary for me to keep a considerable force North Miss to repel any raid from Memphis” and that “Every thing has been sent to Johnston.”

1.45: Letter from Major General S.S. Lee to “General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 3 June 1864 

Scope and Content

Head Qrs Dept. Ala, Miss, & E. La. Meridian, Miss. 2pp. Writes about Adams’ concern regarding the ability of Col. Kennard to manage ordnance stores. Lee notes it was “carelessness sending you the Howitzer with ball in it.” Lee ordered that he be reported, that “all troops are under your control” and that a court martial was possible. Describes troop movement in middle Alabama and attempts to turn back the raid from Memphis on June 2.

1.46: Letter from William Elliot, AAG [for Major General Stephen D. Lee] to “General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 22 June 1864 

Scope and Content

Head Quarters Dept. Ala, Miss & E.La. Meridian, Miss. 2pp. Relating that due to reports of a “heavy force under A.J. Smith is about to leave Memphis for the invasion of Mississippi” that Gholson’s Brigade, one half of Col. Scott’s effective force be moved to various points in Mississippi, primarily around North Mississippi. Lee requests that 500 men be left “in front of Vicksburg.” Lee wanted Adam’s forces to be able to move quickly into North Mississippi if needed but still maintain some show of force near Vicksburg. Adams himself was asked to remain at Jackson but to “hold yourself and staff in readiness to take the field in North Miss at any time that it may be necessary.” Lee also asked Adams to send information about the size of the federal forces near Vicksburg.

1.47: Letter from Col. J.S. Scott, Com’d Cav. Brig. to “Gen’l” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 1 July 1864 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Cav. Brigade, Camp near Hazlehurst. 4pp. Thanks Adams for his praise of his conduct in a recent letter and notes, “it has very seldom been my lot to receive praise from my commanders and that coming, as in the present instance, from a comrade in arms and acquaintance of former days.” Asks that if Adams is able to get General Lee’s consent for him to return to his district that he be allowed to take his supplies and part of his cavalry through the “River Counties.” He also requests that he be allowed to disperse the rest of his cavalry in other areas around East Louisiana and around Natchez. Relates his happiness in learning that General Liddell is to supersede him. The last page of the letter is obscured due to the page being pasted into a place holder.

1.48: Newspaper clipping pasted into scrapbook, “Gen. Slocum’s Expedition to Jackson, Miss.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Unidentified newspaper with reports from S.D. Lee included. 1p. Describes recent action around Jackson, MS and specifically mentions Brigadier General Wirt Adams as well as the wounding of General Gholson.

1.49: 54 Letter from Brigadier General Wirt Adams to “General” [Major General S.D. Lee], 23 July 1864 

Scope and Content

Jackson, [MS]. 4pp. Adams notes that since he has had no time to write of the events around Jackson earlier in the month, due to the fact that he had been compelled to go to Port Gibson soon thereafter and Lee’s “constant occupation in North Miss.” The four page letter is an account of the engagement and Gholson’s role plays a large part in the missive.

1.50: Newspaper page, Mississippian-Extra, 2 August 1864 

Scope and Content

Jackson, MS. 1p. Likely cut out as the primary article on the page is a critique of Stephen D. Lee. The article entitled, “More of Lieut. S.D. Lee,” criticizes Lee’s focus on North Mississippi seemingly at the expense of central Mississippi, especially in the wake of the engagement in Jackson in early July.

1.51: Letter from W.J. Hardee [Brigadier General William Joseph Hardee] to “My dear General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 11 September 1864 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Jonesboro, [AR]. 4pp. Hardee writes that he is near Atlanta and that Sherman “with his army is at or near Atlanta.” Hardee writes, “our Army is greatly reduced in numbers & distributed.” He asks the prophetic question, “How do you feel about the future?” and states that “never in my opinion were our liberties in such danger. What can be done?” He asks Adams for his suggestions to the problem. He notes that he has been “trading with the Yankees” to obtain much needed medical supplies.

1.52: Letter from E. Barksdale [likely Ethelbert Barksdale] to “My Dear Sir” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 19 September 1864 

Scope and Content

Henderson, [Ga?]. 4pp. Giving Adams information about the situation in Georgia, much of it inaccurate. He does feel that the Confederate forces are “too much reduced to venture upon an offensive movement” against Sherman. Barksdale asks about Nathan Bedford Forrest and mentions the Chicago Convention. He generally critiques McClellan and Seward and mentions that he has sent all of his thoughts to President Davis. Interestingly he notes that when writing to Davis he specifically wrote a passage to “relieve his mind of any impressions unfavorable to yourself, if indeed, any have been created.” He promises to relate this again to Davis when he returns to Richmond.

1.53: Letter from Charles W. Anderson, ADC [to Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest] to “Gen’l” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 13 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Head Qtrs Cavalry District of Miss and East La. West Point, Miss. 2pp. Anderson writes at the request of Forrest to alert Adams of a possible attack upon Vicksburg. In preparation Forrest wants information on the location of Adams’ troops, information about his artillery, as well as his supply of ammunition on hand. Forrest also specifically wanted to know where Adams would cross the Big Black River and if Adams felt federal troops would easily and quickly detect this movement. Forrest also asks for Adams’ opinion about the advisability of an attack. Anderson notes that Forrest has been unwell and “suffering in his head for some time past.” Forrest is undergoing treatment for the condition and would attempt to travel by rail to take command, as he is currently unable to ride his horse.

1.54: Letter from Lieutenant General [Richard Taylor] to “General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 16 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Headquarter Dept. Ala, Miss, and E. La. Meridian, [MS]. 2pp. Writes of the importance of re-capturing Vicksburg, as it will greatly help the confidence of the people and build morale, but the strength of troops in the Department are so inadequate as to make such an successful recapture unlikely. Should troops and reinforcements return to the region an attempt to capture Natchez would be much more practicable.

1.55: Telegram from E. Surget, AAG [for Lt. General Richard Taylor] to “Brig-Genl Adams” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 3 April 1865 [note the original printed form had the year 1863 and someone substituted the “3” for a “5”] 

Scope and Content

West Point, [MS]. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. 1p. Relates a report that federal troops entered Selma and burned a portion of the town.

1.56: Telegram from W.F. Bullock, AAG [to General George B. Cosby] to “Brig Genl Wirt Adams”, 4 April 1865 [note the original printed form had the year 1863 and someone substituted the “3” for a “5”] 

Scope and Content

West Point, [MS]. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. 1p. Relates orders of General Taylor for Adams to move with Scott’s Brigades to Columbus where they will be met by Capt. Hough to await further instructions.

1.57: Letter from Brigadier General Wirt Adams to “General”, 7 April 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Cav Brig, Lanier’s Mills. 2pp. Notification of intelligence that federal forces under General Croxton was marching to Tuscaloosa, AL. Adams took action and attempted to intercept the forces. Adams found Croxton to be further ahead than previously thought but attempted a “rapid & vigorous pursuit.” He was able to engage the forces but Croxton was still able to continue his march. Adams followed and engagements ensued in the midst of a strong rainstorm. Even after the charge by Wood’s Regiment, in which Captain Luckett was wounded, Croxton was still able to continue towards Tuscaloosa. Adams outlines what he and his men were able to capture, as well as his own losses, but he did not follow Croxton further. The following scrapbook page contains a penciled note, likely written by Adams at a later date, which reads: “Note The foregoing is a Report of the last fight of my command, and is alluded to by Genl Jordan in his “Life & Campaigns of Forrest” as “the” last engagement of the war east of the Mississippi.” See Jordan’s note page 670.-“

1.58: Telegram from Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest to “Brig Gen. Wirt Adams”, 12 April 1865 [the earlier printed year of 1863 has been crossed through] 

Scope and Content

“Columbus, Miss. By Telegraph from Gainesville, 12th 1865.” 1p. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Forrest announces his arrival and asks Adams for information

1.59: Telegram from Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest to “Gen Wirt Adams”, 12 April 1865 [the earlier printed year of 1863 has been crossed through] 

Scope and Content

“Columbus, Miss. By Telegraph from Gainesville, 12th 1865.” 2pp. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Forrest commands Adams to move with his command, Scott’s brigades, and King’s battalion “at once direct to Eutaw, leaving McCulloch’s right.” Adams was further instructed to send his ordnance officer to Forrest to procure ammunition. Forrest gives Adams permission to impress “all serviceable horses and mules for the use of your command.” Adams does have permission to halt his advance if he learns that federal forces are “moving down the Mobile & Ohio Railroad.” In that case Adams is ordered to contact Forrest at once and wait for General Armstrong.

1.60: Telegram from Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest to “Brig Gen Wirt Adams”, 14 April 1865 [the earlier printed year of 1863 has been crossed through] 

Scope and Content

“Columbus, Miss By Telegraph from Gainesville, 14th 1865.” 2pp. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Forrest has just received news from Colonel Martin that federal forces had just moved from Tuscaloosa on the morning of the 12th down towards Lexington. Martin relays that his scouts are watching the river up to Black Creek Shoals. Forrest also notes that, “the enemy sent off 400 negroes day before direction of Decatur.” Adams is directed not to engage the enemy if they have left Tuscaloosa, as he is directed to move to Eutaw.

1.61: Telegram from Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest to “Brig. Gen Wirt Adams”, 14 April 1865 [the earlier printed year of 1863 has been crossed through] 

Scope and Content

“Columbus, Miss By Telegraph from Gainesville, 13th 1865.” 2pp. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Directs Adams to “move with all your best mounted men so as to cut Croxton off & capture him or drive him from the country.” Notes that he is sending all Adams’ disabled horses artillery and wagons to Eutaw. Once Adams has captured Croxton he is directed to move to Eutaw with his command.

1.62: Letter from George Moorman to “Dear General” [likely sent to Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 4 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Canton, Miss. 4pp. Moorman is seeking information on Adam’s location, as he has been unable to discover it after “several days” of searching. He mentions that he has not heard from Adams since his victory at Gainesville and “that victory will reflect credit ion you in all time to come.” Moorman reflects on their future and past experiences, “While our political and military heavens were surcharged with tokens of the approaching story and our history already [illegible word] with accumulated disaster and defeats, you were the only general officer throughout the length and breadth of the Confederacy who plucked one singly bough of laurel and caused it to be entwined with the cypress wreath which now encircles us. Should the war cease now you would have the honor of having won the last victory on Confederate soil, & in the Confederate cause.” Moorman seems determined to continue though, “But I cannot give up something good will certainly turn up yet. I will never believe that we have failed until the conviction is forced upon me.” He asks to keep a wagon Adams had authorized for his use, as he “cannot hire anything here at all.” But he notes that he will not take the wagon until he hears from Adams. Penciled note, likely from Wirt Adams, on the last page of the letter reads, “Please send Capt. Coopers letter to him immediately.”

1.63: Document, “Meeting of Wirt Adams Cav Regt., In Camp near Gainesville, Sumpter Co. Ala.", 6 May 1865 

Scope and Content

3pp. Signed by Lt. Colonel & Chairman, S.B. Cleaveland [Stephen B. Cleaveland], as well as three secretaries [John A. [Sugg], Lt. Co. E; Wm. Laughlin, Sergt Maj; Jon Barlow, Color Bearer]. Minutes of a meeting of the men of Wirt Adams’ Brigade. During this meeting they developed a “preamble and resolutions which were unanimously adopted.” The resolutions and preamble basically outlined the men’s admiration for the leadership of Wirt Adams during the Civil War. The document begins by stating that although they are now “exiles in a foreign land, or, aliens in our own homes” they could not disband without letting Adams know of their high regard. They describe him as “a gentleman, a patriot and soldier.” They note “he was among the first to espouse what he believed to be the defense of his country’s rights and honor, and he numbered among the last to yield her standard, or let the folds of her ensign trail in the dust.” The men resolve to “tender to him our most hearty thanks for all that he has done for us, and, our common country.” They also declare that the will “always be proud to mention him as our first Colonel and last Brig Genl.” They also want to make sure that this resolution will be filed in the adjutant’s office and a copy “be transmitted to Brig. Genl Wirt Adams by a committee of three members of the Regiment.”

1.64: Document from Brig. General Wirt Adams to “Gentlemen” [John A. [Sugg] Lt. Co. E; Wm. Laughlin, Sergt Maj; Jon Barlow, Color Bearer], 8 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs. Cavalry Brigade. 4pp. A copy of a document sent by Adams in response to the resolutions submitted to him dated 6 May 1865. Adams declares his regard for all his men with whom he has been “intimately associated during the severe trials of the war just closed and whose valor discipline and devotion to our sacred cause I have witnessed and admired.” He thanks them for the copy of their resolutions and states he will always preserve it. He hopes that the future will be bright, although it appears currently to be a “starless night of a fallen country.” He relates that their country is “no longer ours. Her institutions political and moral; the system of labor wisely ordained by God for the climate and social we have enjoyed and which has been carefully fostered and sustained by our people with incalculable benefit to the slave, to the world and to ourselves; the distinctive features of our society resulting from this system and which has elevated our people above all other American society; these must all speedily disappear beneath the overwhelming tide of Yankee fanaticism, cant, hypocrisy, and knavery.” He admits that the southern people must now adapt to “the new order of things” but not “lost all those attractive traits of character we have in the past been taught to admire and respect.” He cites his concern over the burden of federal taxation and “the restriction of the right of suffrage…and the practical enforcement of the political and social equality of the negro.” He is worried that many will “bend their necks to the Yankee to the yoke thus imposed.” He states that it is their duty, “as honorable men, as brothers, husbands and fathers …to exert ourselves to the utmost to extricate ourselves and those dependent upon us from such misery and humiliation.”

1.65: Document, “Mention of Gen D.W. Adams in Report of Battle Shiloh.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

2pp. Contains quotes regarding Adams’ bravery during the Battle of Shiloh from various official reports.

1.66: Newspaper clipping, “Meeting of the Joint Committee’s of Liberal Republicans: Resolutions of Respect to the Memory of Gen. D.W. Adams” and “Funeral Obsequies of the late General Dan. W. Adams.”, [15 June 1872] 

Scope and Content

Penciled notation reads, “N.O. Times, 15 June ’72.”

1.67: Newspaper clipping with printed letter by Wirt Adams, 29 March 1887 

Scope and Content

Jackson, Miss. 1p. Adams thanks someone for inviting him to attend the unveiling of the “equestrian statue of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston” on April 6. He notes he “shall esteem it both a duty and pleasure to obey your kindly summons to be present on this interesting occasion.”

1.68: Pasted-in newspaper clipping. “Relating to the Annals. A Letter in Regard to the Capture of the Gunboat Petrel on the Yazoo River.”, [September 1884] 

Scope and Content

Notation at bottom reads, “Phil Times, Sept. 84.” 1p. Correct General Dabney Maury’s earlier attribution of the capture of the Petrel to Colonel Ross. Documents proving that Wirt Adams’ command captured the gunboat are included in the article. Note: this article appears on the end-page of the scrapbook.

1.69: Pasted-in newspaper clipping. “General Armstrong’s Raid. Gallant Charge of Colonel Wirt Adams Upon the Federal Fortification.”, [9 May 1885] 

Scope and Content

Notation at bottom reads, “Annals of the War, Phil Times, 9 May ’85.” 1p. Describes action by Wirt Adams Cavalry during a summer 1862 engagement in North Mississippi. Note: Similar to the smaller clipping described in 3.9, “Gen. Wirt Adams’ Desperate Charge Twenty-three Years Ago.”

1.70: Pasted-in newspaper clipping, “How Promptness Won. How Colonel Wirt Adams Drove the Federal Cavalry from a Strong Position.”, [26 June 1886] 

Scope and Content

Article written by Allen T. Bowie, Adjutant. Notation at bottom reads, “Phila Times, 26 June ’86.” 1p. Describes the actions taken by then Colonel Wirt Adams surrounding the Battle of Davis’ Bridge in October 1862.

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Box 2: Scrapbook 2 1857-1888 

Scope and Content

Scrapbook containing original correspondence, newspaper clippings, and epherma collected by General Wirt Adams

2.1: Pasted-in undated, unattributed newspaper clipping, “Death of Childhood.”, [date unknown] 

2.2: Pasted-in unattributed newspaper clipping, “For the Bite of a Mad Dog.”, [date unknown] 

2.3: Pasted unattributed newspaper clipping, regarding the cleaning of men’s shirts, [date unknown] 

2.4: Pasted-in speech, “Speech of Hon. L.Q.C. Lamar, of Mississippi, on the Election of Speaker, And in Reply to Hon. W. Kellog, of Illinois, Delivered in the House of Representatives, December 7, 1859.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Printed by Lemuel Towers. 7pp.

2.5: Page with four pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

One religious in nature; on “The Horse Charm; or the Great Secret for Taming Horses;” “How Union-Saving is Viewed at the North;” and an article about raising fruit trees.

2.6: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

“The Indication of the Coming Storm,” regarding the secession crisis and “Southern Men Read. William H. Sward Again Proclaims the Doctrine of the ‘Higher Law’ and the ‘Irrepressible Conflict.’”

2.7: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Col. B.B. Perry Again- Southern Causes for Independence.”, [date unknown] 

2.8: Page with three pasted-in newspaper clippings, all regarding secession, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

Two untitled, one “The Course Lincoln Will Pursue.”

2.9: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Abolition Outrages in the Salve States- Mr. Seward’s Position.”, [date unknown] 

2.10: Page with three pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

“The ‘Wide Awakes;’” “What Would be the Effect of Lincoln’s Election?” and “Webster on States Rights and Obligations.”

2.11: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

“Mr. Cushing on Black Republicanism” and “Friday’s Proceedings, Washington, December 16.”

2.12: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Sematpr Seward Down East. The First Campaign Speech of Mr. Seward. The Irrepressible Conflict More Boldly Proclaimed.”, [1860] 

Scope and Content

Penciled notation reads “1860.”

2.13: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Patriotism and Demagogism.”, 24 October 1855 

Scope and Content

Journal of Commerce. New York. Continues on the next page of scrapbook.

2.14: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Mr. Hammond’s Resolutions.”, [date unknown] 

2.15: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

One containing a letter attributed to Frederick Douglass and the other entitled, “The Gallows and the Gibbet” regarding Tom Corwin’s speech.

2.16: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [one date unknown]; 29 October 1857 

Scope and Content

“To What Free Labor Leads” and “Is it best to Fight with the South?” The latter article was taken from The Daily Delta, 29 October 1857.

2.17: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

“What they Propose to Do” regarding slavery and free labor and “Anti-Slavery Resolves of the Main Legislature” with a penciled in notation reading “1859.”

2.18: Page with three pasted-in newspaper clippings, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

“Incendiary Publications in the Mail” regarding sending materials intended to incite slaves; “The Kind of Book it Is,” regarding the abolition of slavery; and “Elegant Extract,” which relates to the preservation of constitutional government.

2.19: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, 21 November 1859; 31 December 1859 

Scope and Content

“A Public Meeting in Natick, Mass, The Home of Senator Wilson, on Slave Insurrections” dated 21 November 1859; and “The Commission to Virginia,” regarding South Carolina’s desire for southern states to meet and discuss secession, from the Tri-Weekly Mercury, 31 December 1859.

2.20: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

“Important Letter,” regarding a letter on the political affairs of the country written by Dr. Stephen Douglas of Natchez, MS. This article appeared in The Daily Whig, likely in 1869; Southern Unanimity,” and states that “the people of Mississippi will respond with almost one mind to the resolution of the Democratic Convention of the State which looks to the remedy of disunion in the event of the election of a Black Republican to the Presidency.”

2.21: Inserted newspaper clipping from The Sunday Delta, 1860, “Political Retrospect.”, [date unknown] 1860 

Scope and Content

The article discusses the recent election and its consequences.

2.22: Page with three pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

One from The Daily Delta, noting the body of the Charleston Convention, including the number of delegates from free and slave states; the second with a penciled in notation of “1860” discusses the formation of a “Southern Rights Association” in Louisiana; the final article with the penciled notation of “1860” is entitled, “Extract from the Speech of Charles Sumner on the Election of Lincoln.”

2.23: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, 19 January 1861; [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

One clipping from Charleston, 19 January 1861 is entitled, “Union with the Northern States Necessarily Destructive of Southern Liberty;” the second clipping is entitled, “The Spirit of the Black Republican Organization.”

2.24: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [date unknown]; 7 March 1861 

Scope and Content

One relates to the resolutions passed for the formation “of a Southern Confederacy” and contains Convention Resolutions, No. 5, which outlines the 1861 Mississippi State Convention, regarding secession of the state; the second clipping is from the New Orleans Daily Crescent, 7 March 1861 and is entitled, “Interesting Statistics.” Contains information about the populations of the states which had seceded by that time, as well as information on railroads.

2.25: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

One entitled, “The Census of 1861- The Free and Salve Population of the United States;” the second clipping is untitled but relates to England’s reliance on cotton in slave states.

2.26: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

“The Inaugural Address of President Lincoln” by R.B. Rhett, Jr. from the Tri-Weekly Mercury contains commentary on the address; the second clipping is untitled but provides statistics on the standing army of the United States.

2.27: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Southern Fortifications.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

The article gives statistics regarding garrisons on the Southern coast.

2.28: Inserted Broadsheet, “Resolution, Providing for the Appointment of Commissioners, &c.”, 30 November 1860 

Scope and Content

Approved by Governor John J. Pettus, 30 November 1860. Document outlines the appointment of commissioners who will be directed to visit all the slaveholding states, “whose duty it shall be to inform them that this Legislature has passed an act calling a Convention of the people of the State, to consider the present threatening relations of the Northern and Southern sections of the Confederacy, aggravated by the recent election of a President upon principles of hostility to the States of the South, and to express the earnest hope of Mississippi that those States will co-operate with her in the adoption of efficient measures for their common defense and safety.”

2.29: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “The Popular Vote.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Tables relating to the turns of the Presidential election form the N.Y. Day Book.

2.30: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Important Resolution of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.”, [date unknown] 

2.31: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “The Mobile Monumental Statue.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Regarding to statue in Mobile, Alabama’s Magnolia Cemetery dedicated to their Confederate dead.

2.32: Page with pasted-in newspaper clipping, “Register of Rain as Kept at Hatch & [illegible] Nursery and Green-House Near Jackson, Mississippi, From July 1st, 1854 to January 1st, 1859.”, [date unknown] 

2.33: Page with two pasted-in newspaper clippings, [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

One entitled “Of What Women are Made” and the second “Matrimony.”

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Box 3: Scrapbook Loose Materials 1864-1925 

Scope and Content

Contains loose materials originally found in the scrapbooks, processed to match their original order, as well as other loose documents and newspaper clippings.

3.1: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: Spine portion of scrapbook cover, 

3.2: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: Loose newspaper clipping from The Daily Picayune in New Orleans, LA, 14 February 1888 

Scope and Content

A particular article entitled, “The Muster Roll,” outlined in pen, indicating a special significance. The article describes a “registering of the veteran cavalrymen” who met at Washington. This group added “over a hundred names” to the muster roll. Many of the names on this list were from Wirt Adams’ Regiment and Brigade, including an entry for “Wirt Adams, brigadier general, CSA, Jackson, Miss.” Originally located in Scrapbook One between 1.3 and 1.4.

3.3: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: 1873-1884 

Scope and Content

Five documents originally located in Scrapbook One between 1.41 and 1.42.

Letter from Brigadier General Wirt Adams to [William] B. Field, Esq [from Natchez, MS], 13 October 1884 

Scope and Content

2pp. Describes an error in an attribution of the capture of the Petrel to Ross’ Brigade, noting it was men under his command, specifically Colonel Griffith, who captured the gunboat.

Letter from William B. Field to “Gen. Wirt Adams”, 9 October 1864 

Scope and Content

Natchez, [MS]. 2pp. Request from Field to Adams for details regarding the capture of the gunboat Petrel.

Letter from Wade Hampton to “My Dear Sir” [General Wirt Adams], 25 June 1875 

Scope and Content

Charlottesville, [VA]. 3pp. Envelope included with $.3 stamp. Hampton writes, “Ive Davis spoke to me his reference to the place you had proposed to place his uncle in business & I write to say that it will give me real pleasure to cooperate with you, if I can be of any service.”

Letter from Wade Hampton to “My Dear General” [General Wirt Adams], 27 November 1873 

Scope and Content

Charlottesville, [VA]. 3pp. A reference to his work in “the Society” and a request for Adams’ help to increase members. This is possibly a reference to the Southern Historical Society.

Letter from Wade Hampton to “My Dear General” [General Wirt Adams], 28 March 1874 

Scope and Content

1p. Thanks Adams for his check and relates if he feels better he would like to soon visit Adams in Vicksburg. Includes envelope with $.3 stamp.

3.4: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: Undated, unidentified loose letter to “General” [likely Brigadier General Wirt Adams], [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Penciled-in date, likely by Wirt Adams at a later date, reads, “15th Oct. 1863.” 2pp. Commends the action of Capt. [Bowrie] and his “Alabama Squadron” in a recent encounter with federal troops where they “checked the advance of the enemy’s whole force.” Originally located in Scrapbook One between 1.42 and 1.43.

3.5: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: Incomplete letter likely from Brigadier General Wirt Adams to “General” [likely Major General S.D. Lee], 8 July 1864 

Scope and Content

5 pages. Last page held together by pins. An account of the action around Jackson in early July when Adams’ forces drove federal troops away from Jackson. Originally located in Scrapbook One between 1.47 and 1.48.

3.6: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: Letter from T.B. Creagh, Ex. Brevt. Lt. of Co. I, W.A. [R of C] to “Genl Wirt Adams, Jackson, Miss.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Grove Hill, Clarke Co. Ala. 3pp. Creagh notes the attached “resolutions of respect & good will tendered by the members of old Company I of Wirt Adam’s Regt of Cavalry.” Attached resolutions were created after an 1886 reunion of old Company I. They write, “That we the survivors of said Co. I of said Regiment, 25 years after we became members of said regiment and 21 years, 3 months, and 12 days since we were discharged from the Army, can not in justice to our feelings break up from this meeting without expressing our great love and respect for Genl Wirt Adams.” Signed by 20 members of Company I. Originally located in Scrapbook One between 1.64 and 1.65.

3.7: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: 1865 

Scope and Content

Five documents originally located in Scrapbook One between 1.67 and the contents of folder 3.8.

Document. “Preambles and Resolutions of Wirt Adams Cavalry, passed May 6th 1865 and reply of Genl Wirt Adams to same, Preserved by James A. May of Co. “E” Genl Wirt Adams’ old regiment of Cavalry.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

6pp. Typed documents of handwritten documents 1.68 and 1.69 in scrapbook.

Circular from Lt. Genl Forrest by J.P. Strange, AAG to Forrest, to Brig Genl Wirt Adams, 7 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Forrest C Corps, Gainesville. 1p. Directions regarding the paroling of former Confederate troops.

Memorandum from Mag. Genl. E.R.S. Canby to Brig. Genl Wirt Adams, Comdg Cavalry, “Announcing Terms of Surrender”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

2pp. Document outlining the parole procedures, such as men and officers paroled, “under this agreement will be allowed to return to their homes with the assurance that they will not be disturbed by the authorities of the United State so long as they continue to observe the conditions of their paroles and the laws in force when they reside except that persons residents of Northern states will not be allowed to return without premission.”

Document, “Meeting of Wirt Adams Cav. Regt. In Camp near Gainesville, Sumpter Co. Ala.”, 6 May 1865 

Scope and Content

3pp. Seems to be another handwritten copy of the preamble and resolutions of the document described in 1.68 and 1.74

Two Circulars, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Advertisements for “The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government By Jefferson Davis, First Edition of 25,000. Second Edition In Press.”

3.8: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: 17 documents originally grouped in folded piece of paper 1865; 1885 

Scope and Content

17 grouped documents originally located in Scrapbook One between the contents of folder 3.7 and the contents of folder 3.9.

Copy of letter from W.F. Bullock, Jr., AAG to “General” [Maj. Genl N.B. Forrest, Commanding & c. West Point, Miss.], 17 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Head Qts Dept. Ala. Miss and Ea La., Meridian, [MS]. 1p. Brig Genl. Wirt Adams, Comd. Dist SM Ea La, Offical, P. Ellis Jr. AAG [Powhatan Ellis]. Directed to let Forrest know that Thomas “will move in this direction with a large force from Vicksburg that another column from Pensacola and probably another from the direction of Decatur will move simultaneously with him.” Bullock encloses a telegraph sent to Brigadier General Wirt Adams regarding action, although “this order is of course subject to any arrangements of its details that your good judgment may deem necessary.” Bullock specifically tells Forrest that he is directed to give subordinate commanders authority to “impress upon them that while it is important to destroy all cotton that may be within reach of the enemy’s lines of march and from its location liable to fall into his hands and be used and moved by him. That cotton removed from water courses and beyond the power of the enemy to move should not be destroyed.”

Handwritten copy of contents of a telegram from E. Surget, Lt. Col & AAG [AAG to Lieutentant General R. Taylor] to “Lt. Genl. Forrest.”, 30 April 1865 

Scope and Content

Meridian, [MS]. Wirt Adams copied as well. 1p. Gives notice of the “cessation of hostilities by agreement with Genl Canby” and a notice that Forrest is to advise Genl Croxton of this cessation and give notice of negotiations for a “final settlement of difficulties” between Generals Johnston and Sherman.

Copy of handwritten circular, “by order of Lt. Genl Forrest.”, 4 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Forrest Cavalry Corps. Gainesville. 1p. Copy for Brig Genl Wirt Adams, Comdg & c. Asking for division commanders to have duplicate muster rolls of “those present and absent” giving their residence and if they were absent a date when they last were present. Forrest also directs all Quartermasters, Commissaries, Ordnance Officers, and Surgeons “to make out in duplicate … all government property in their possession and that Brigade Commanders will be held responsible for the forthcoming and delivery of all such, when ordered.”

Copy of handwritten circular, “by order of Lt. Genl Forrest.”, 7 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Forrest Cav Corps. Gainesville. 1p. Copy for Brig Genl Wirt Adams, Comd & c. Directs that all artillery, small arms, ammunition and ordnance be sent to Forrest’s headquarters and “be turned over to Capt. C.[S.] Hill Chief Ordnance. All transportation, “reserving a sufficient number of wagons to haul forage,” will be turned over to Maj. RM Mason, Chief Qr. Master.

Letter from W.A. Goodman, AAG, to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 9 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs. Chalers Div., Near Gainesville. 1p. Lets Adams know that the US commissioner who will parole their corps has arrived and will probably “commence work at once.” Goodman notes that he has brought “a very insufficient supply of paroles” which could delay the process.

Letter from [W. Ashton?] to Genl Wirt Adams, 27 December 1885 

Scope and Content

Shreveport, La. On “Headquarters, Benevolent Association of Confederate Veterans” letterhead. 1p. Invites Adams to a reunion on the 8th of January.

Letter from by J.P. Strange, AAG [AAG to Forrest] to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams, Comdg Cavalry], 2 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Forrect Cavalry Corps. Gainesville. 1p. Directs Adams to supply his men with five days rations and “be ready to move at a moments notice.” Written on the back of a general order form with the phrase, “By Command of Maj. Genl Forrest” engraved on the bottom.

Incomplete telegram [possibly from N.B. Forrest] to Brig. Genl. Wirt Adams, 21 February 1865 

Scope and Content

From Meridian, [MS]. 2pp. Gives orders for Adams should the enemy move. There are a number of abbreviations in the telegram making its exact nature difficult to determine, possibly written in code.

Handwritten copy of telegram from W.F. Bullock Jr., AAG, to Brig Genl. Wirt Adams, 17 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Maridian [sic.], [MS]. 1p. Written to Adams who was then located in Jackson, MS. Adams is directed to ensure that all public property which could fall into federal hands be removed and “provide for withdrawal of forces in Southern portion of your district by such lines as will prevent their being cut off and insure their joining you in front of Enemy if he advances.” Adams is also directed to send a copy of this telegram to Brigadier General Wright to get his guidance.

Telegram from W.F. Bullock, Jr., AAG to Brig Genl Wirt Adams, 24 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Meridian, [MS]. Written on South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. 2pp. Notifies Adams that federal forces are “threatening Central Alabama from Huntsville & Whitesburgh.” General Maury reports that between twelve and fourteen thousand troops are at Pensacola. Lt. General Taylor orders Adams to send General Forrest troops from his district.

Telegram from Maj. Genl N.B. Forrest to Genl. Wirt Adams, 19 February 1865 [Note the original printed date of 1864 has been crossed through] 

Scope and Content

West Point, Miss. 2pp. Written on South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Gives Adams orders to “retain all cavalry now with you until further orders Send for Blackburn & Johnson’s Companies & Montgomery’s squadron now on the river.” Adams is also directed to use Cobb’s company of scouts.

Telegram from W.F. Bullock, Jr., AAG, to Brig Genl Wirt Adams, 21 February 1865 [note the original printed date of 1864 is not crossed through but the year of 1865 is noted on the back page of document] 

Scope and Content

Meridian, [MS]. 2pp. On South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Tells Adams that his line will be the most important one to defend should the enemy comes from Vicksburg. It will be important for Adams to leave a company of scouts to gather information about movements.

Handwritten copy of telegram from J.P. Strange, AAG [AAG to Forrest] to “Genl” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams], 2 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs. Forrest’s Cavalry Corps. Gainesville. 1p. Forrest directs Adams to “collect your command together and be in readiness to move at a moments notice.” Note: Written on the back of a general order form with the phrase, “By Command of Maj. Genl Forrest” engraved on the bottom.

Telegram from W.F. Bullock, Jr, AAG, written to Gen. Wirt Adams, 17 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Meridian, [MS]. 1p. Written on South-Western Telegram Company. Directs Adams to remove public property which could fall into federal hands and “provide for the withdrawal of forces in the southern portion of your District by such lines as will prevent their being cut off & insure them joining you in front of the enemy if he advances.”

Telegram from W.F. Bullock, JR., AAG, likely sent to Brigadier General Wirt Adams, although not noted, February 1865 

Scope and Content

1p. Written on South-Western Telegraph Company letterhead. Directs recipient to accept “such modifications as Maj. Genl. Forrest may direct. By order of Lt. Gen. Taylor.”

Letter from Charles W. Anderson, ADC [to Maj. General N.B. Forrest] to Brigadier General Wirt Adams, 22 February 1865 

Scope and Content

Head Qtrs Cavalry, Dept. of Ala Miss and East La. West Point, Miss. 1p. Re: Directs Adams to withdraw from “the Bottom” and send “everything that can be made available in meeting and retarding the progress of the Enemy from Vicksburg and Baton Rouge.” Adams is also directed to report his “present available force” to Forrest.

Letter from P. Ellis Jr. AAG [Powhatan Ellis] written to “General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams, Comdg Dist S.M. & Ea. La, Jackson, Miss.], 18 February 1865 

Scope and Content

West Point, Miss. 2pp. Written on “Head-Quarters Cavalry, Dis Miss., and E. La.” Note “Department Ala” was crossed out. Directs the movement of troops, especially those of General Hodge, to Jackson. Also directs that all public property, “except what is absolutely necessary” be removed to Meridian.

3.9: Scrapbook One Loose Materials: [1885] 

Scope and Content

Two newspaper clippings originally located in Scrapbook One between the contents of folder 3.7 and 1.68.

Newspaper clipping, “Gen. Wirt Adams’ Desperate Charge Twenty-three Years Ago.”, [date likely 1885] 

Scope and Content

1p. Describes actions of Wirt Adams Cavalry during a summer 1862 engagement in North Mississippi.

Newspaper clipping, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

1p. describes the antebellum Wirt Adams & Co. bank, located at Vicksburg and Jackson.

3.10: Scrapbook Two Loose Materials: [dates unknown] 

Scope and Content

Originally located at beginning of Scrapbook Two before 2.1.

Collection of newspaper clippings, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Envelope containing them describes them containing “statistics of the War.”

Newspaper clipping, “Cartel between the Confederate States and the United States.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

The Clarion. 1p. Enclosed in an envelope addressed to “General Wirt Adams, No. 60 Carondelet Street, New Orleans Miss.” Postmark from Liverpool dated 28 February 1877. Also included in envelope is loose newspaper article, “The Volunteer Army of 1861-65.”

Envelope containing newspaper clippings identified as “Confederates, Extracts from Newspapers Relating to the War & c., Brig. Genl Wirt Adams”, [multiple dates, some unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains clipping from The Vicksburg Daily White, 29 May 1862; Undated, unattributed clipping outlining Confederate casualties at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Bristoe Station, Port Hudson, Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Port Gibson, Fourteen Mile Creek (skirmish), Raymond, Jackson, Champion’s Hill, Big Black Railroad Bridge, Vicksburg, Prairie Grove, Stones River, Chickamauga, and Bridgeport; Undated, unattributed newspaper clipping outlining Union re-enlistments by state; Undated, unattributed newspaper clipping, “Southern Opinion. Letter from a Distinguished Southern Clergyman;” Newspaper clipping from the New York Daily News, 26 December 1863, entitled “The President’s Message” in regards to emancipation; Undated, unattributed newspaper article entitled, “A Stirring Ballad. A Ballad for the Young South.”

3.11: Scrapbook Two Loose Materials: Letter from Wirt Adams to A. [Larrie] Esq, [three illegible words], New Orleans, 11 October 1865 

Scope and Content

Canton, Miss. 3pp. Adams writes that he sent a “reliable & energetic” person to take charge of “[darkies?] for the Bank.” Adams wrote “He is very interested to employ … the negro woman formerly belonging to their place in the country” and was also looking for other African American women to help. Originally located in Scrapbook Two between 2.31 and 3.12.

3.12: Scrapbook Two Loose Materials: Document written by Brigadier General Wirt Adams, 11 January 1864 

Scope and Content

Hd. Qrs Cav. Brig. 1p. Seems to contain information about troop movement. Note: heavily annotated. On verso: Letter written by Brigadier General Wirt Adams to Thos. L. Jackson, AAG. January 1864. Olive Branch. 1p. Letter relates to information about Baton Rouge, La and Port Hudson. Note: heavily annotated. Originally located in Scrapbook Two between 3.11 and 2.32.

3.13: Scrapbook Two Loose Materials: 34 newspaper clippings at end of scrapbook 1864-1879 

Scope and Content

Originally located at the end of Scrapbook Two.

Newspaper page from The Daily Picayune, 18 October 1877 

Scope and Content

Contains articles on “The Need of Levees;” How Scalping Felt;” and “To the Editors of the State of Louisiana.”

Newspaper clipping containing a poem entitled, “The Martyr of Alexandria,” and an article entitled, ‘A Patriot in the Pulpit”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

The verso contains articles about the theater and a military picnic on the fourth of July.

Newspaper clipping entitled, “Castelar to Madam Thiers. An Eloquent Letter of Condolence from the Most Eminent of Spanish Orators.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping entitled, “The Negro’s Mule.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping entitled, “Sumner’s Swivel Rights”, [date unknown] 

Untitled newspaper clipping, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains an account of Mr. Crittenden of Kentucky’s defense of a man indicted for a capital offense. Contains quotations from his closing arguments.

Newspaper clipping containing article, The Lime-Kiln Club Celebrates the Advent of Spring.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

On verso: “The Negro Kansas Mania".

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Population and Votes.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Outlines the percentage of the population who voted for the President in 1880.

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Liability of Express Companies.”, [date unknown] 

Incomplete newspaper clipping, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains information about the state of the railroad in the 1880s.

Newspaper clipping containing poem entitled, “Battle of Dorking.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Article from The New Orleans Times.

Newspaper clipping containing information on the Charleston banks and “How Charlemagne Conquered the Mohammedans.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping containing article entitled, “Fraud as a Fine Art.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper article containing letter written to the editor of The Mississippian, [date unknown] letter dated 15 March 1864 

Scope and Content

The author relates being in the camp of Wirt Adams on February 3rd and described the ensuing encounter Adams’ men had with General McPherson’s men around Champion’s Hill.

Newspaper article entitled, “Rainy Weather. An Interesting Table Prepared from Figures Obtained at the Signal Office.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Notes the amount of rainfall during the months of July and August from 1871 to 1882.

Newspaper article entitled, “Eleven Million Voters. Males of Twenty-one Years of Age and Over In the United States.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Outlines the number of males 21 and up who could vote in 1880.

Newspaper clipping containing poem, “Antony and Cleopatra.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article, “Daniel Webster’s Private Opinion of Henry Clay.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article, “Southern State Debts.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article, “Consolidation of the States, No. 1. By D.K. Whitaker, LL.D.”, 9 November 1879 

Scope and Content

Also includes partial article, “Work of the S.P.C.” Articles from The Daily Picayune, Quadruple Sheet.

Newspaper clipping with article, “The Peace Negotiations. The Territorial Changes- Reconstructed Germany-Count Karolyi to Return to Berlin- No German Parliament to Assemble as Yet- Meeting of the Representatives at Brunswick- The Diet to be Dissolved.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article, “A Terrific Retort. Allen and Morton.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Taken from the New Orleans Herald, undated. Verso contains articles on yellow fever in Mississippi and information from the Mississippi Legislature.

Newspaper clipping with article, “Bite of a Rattlesnake Cured in Two Hours.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping containing articles, “Bull-Dozing the colored Voters in Boston” and “Needed in Mississippi.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Also includes an article listing the outcome of the vote in Mississippi for the Fifth Congressional District and the Sixth Congressional District.

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Auditorial Items.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Information on the value of personal property in Mississippi in the late 1870s.

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Comparative Crop Statement.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains information on the number of bales produced from 1824-1888.

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Von Moltke on West Point. The Reason Why Our Civil War Failed to Produce a Distinguished General.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Anecdotes of Gen. Forrest.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping containing article, “The Mississippi. How the Money Will Be Expended by the Commissioners.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Information about the funds for the Mississippi River Commission.

Newspaper clipping containing poem, “Angel Mother Watch For Me.”, 28 July [year unknown] 

Scope and Content

Also contains an article on an interview with Von Moltke. Article from the Lynchburg Virginian.

Newspaper article, “Wont Clasp Hands.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Desire by southerners to “shake hands over the ‘bloody chasm’” through politics.

Newspaper page with notated article, “Agricultural. The Farm-Work Shop-Factory-Home-School-Church.", 14 October 1877 

Scope and Content

Article from The Daily Picayune. Triple Sheet. Also contains “Had He a Charmed Life? A Strange Incident in the Career of Stonewall Jackson – The Vain Efforts of a Northern Rifleman to Slay the Silent Hero of Manassas—A Strange Reminiscence of the Wilderness.” On Verso: poem, “Night and Dawn.” By Lewis Ellis. Also on verso: “Ghost Stories.”

Newspaper clipping with article, “Commerce and Finance. Louisiana Products.”, 28 February 1879 

Scope and Content

The Daily Picayune.

Loose newspaper clipping with article, “To Immigrants. Populations of Cities in this State [Mississippi] How to Reach Mississippi.”, [date unknown] 

3.14: Letters and Documents 1865-1888 

Notes, “Brief notes of the War for the use of Col. JFH Claiborne.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Written by [Brigadier General Wirt Adams]. 3pp. Relates the events surrounding the Battle of Davis’ Bridge.

Additional page of notes for Col. Claiborne, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Written by [Brigadier General Wirt Adams]. 1p. Contains brief notes about the Battle of Shiloh, the capture of the gunboat Petrel, and his part in Grierson’s Raid.

Document, “Notes of the War” [the word brief was crossed through], [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Written by [Brigadier General Wirt Adams]. 9pp. Relates not only his wartime history but his early history as well.

Order from Lt. General Taylor, written by WF Bullock Jr., 21 February [year not provided] 

Scope and Content

2pp. Likely written for Brigadier General Wirt Adams, this order contains various scenarios for the movement of his forces which depend upon the movement of federal forces.

Set of three attached documents: a newspaper clipping containing General Adams’ notice to Jefferson Davis of the capture of the Petrel; Printed broadside. “General Orders, No. 53, Head Qrs. Dept. Ala., Miss. and E. La., Demopolis, ALA. March 25th 1864. By command of Lieut. Gen’l Polk.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains a reminder that property confiscated from prisoners of war is the property of the Confederate government. Also contains an alert regarding non-military personnel “banding together for the purpose, professedly, of preying upon the public enemy.” The final attached document contains a handwritten letter from Douglas West, Maj &AAG written to “General” [Brigadier General Wirt Adams through Maj Genl SD Lee]. 7 May 1864. Demopolis. 1p. References the attached newspaper clipping and General Orders, No. 53.

Document. “Parole of Honor” for Brigadier General Wirt Adams, PACS, 12 May 1865 

Scope and Content

Gainesville, Ala. Approved and signed by Brigadier General, CSA, HH Jackson and Brigadier General, USA, E.S. Dennis.

Letter from members of Company I, Alabama Squadron, Wirt Adams Brigade, to Brig. General Adams, 25 March 1867 

Scope and Content

Mobile, [AL] 1p. Former members of the brigade asking for a photograph of Adams.

Letter from J.P. Pryor to “Dear Sir” [Gen. Wirt Adams, Vicksburg, Miss.], 3 July 1867 

Scope and Content

Memphis, Tennessee. 1p. Author of letter has been working on writing “Memoir of Forrests Cavalry Corps” along with General Jordan. They request that Adams send information “of both your private and public life, before, during and since the war.” Note: pencil notation on back of letter reads, “Papers relating to the War.”

Letter from Wade Hampton to “My Dear General” [Wirt Adams], 16 November 1873 

Scope and Content

Charlottesville, Va. 2pp. Request from Hampton for Adams to help raise awareness and membership for the Southern Historical Society.

Letter from Wirt Adams to General Wade Hampton, 22 November [1873] 

Scope and Content

Vicksburg, [MS]. 2pp. A response to a letter from Hampton. Adams promises to comply with Hampton’s request to help raise membership for the Southern Historical Society.

Letter from Geo. Moorman, 1st Vice President Organization & for Louisiana, to Genl Wirt Adams, Jackson, Miss., 26 February 1888 

Scope and Content

Written on Memorandum, Office Of Covington and St. Tammany Land Improvement Company. 1p. Re: Requests that Adams send him a copy of his speech which was delivered at “the Cavalry Reunion,” so that it could be published in a pamphlet.

3.15: Newspaper Clippings 1872-1877 

Newspaper clipping with incomplete article, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

A Representative from Kentucky protests a tax that benefits war efforts.

Newspaper clipping with untitled article, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

About General Bee at the Battle of First Bull Run.

Newspaper clipping with incomplete article, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Regarding the death of a former soldier.

Newspaper clipping with article by Jas. R. Chalmers entitled “Mississippi.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains information about elections, violence, and the political situation.

Newspaper clipping with incomplete article, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Regarding Wirt Adams, the ‘cut-off question,’ and the safety of Vicksburg.

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “How Bishop Polk Fell.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “A Frightful Picture of Carpet Bag and Scalawag Rule in South Carolina. An Appeal to Congress - An Investigation Prayed For.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Grant and the South. What Ex-Senator Clingman, of North Carolina, Said in a Recent Interview.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Letter from Hon. Jeff. Davis.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Macon, Ga, April 26. Response from Davis to the Memorial Association of Macon.

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Letter from Hon. J.Q. Adams on the Situation.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Pencil notation reads, “Clarion, Dec. 7th ’71.”

Newspaper clipping with letter from Reverdy Johnson in response “To Messrs. Wilson, Oliver, Davis and others, Committee, Etc”, [1872] 

Scope and Content

Regarding Johnson’s inability to attend the ratification meeting at be held in Washington.

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Beauregard on the Battle of Manassas.”, 7 March 1876 

Scope and Content

New Orleans.

Newspaper clipping from The Daily Picayune, 18 September 1877 

Scope and Content

Contains article entitled, “No Great Standing Army. This Country Will Never Be Governed By Military Power.”

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Letter from Hon. Jefferson Davis. Beauvoir, Harrison Co., Miss, June 10th 1878.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Jeff. Davis on Secession. Another Letter on the Subject of Congressman Singleton’s Speech.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Contains a reprinted letter from Jefferson Davis written from Beauvoir, Harrison Co, MS, 10 June 1878.

3.16: Article, “Wirt Adams, Gallant Soldier,” printed in Illinois Central Magazine, November 1925 

Scope and Content

Three original copies and one facsimile.

3.17: Photographs [date unknown] 

Three 5x7” reprints of photographs of General Wirt Adams, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

Taken at various stages of his life.

CD-R disk, 

Scope and Content

Contains digital images of the three prints.

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Box 4: Oversized Materials 1861-1888 

Scope and Content

Contains oversized documents, including newspapers and military documents.

4.1: Oversized Documents July 1864 

Document, “Morning Report of Present in Cavalry Brigade, Commanded by Col. JS Scott.”, 16 July 1864 

Scope and Content

Near Port Gibson, MS.

Document, “Morning Report of Woods Brigade, Adams Cavalry Division, Lee’s Corps. Corps Commanded by Col. Robert C. Wood Jr.”, 25 July 1864 

Scope and Content

Near Dry Grove, MS.

4.2: Oversized Newspapers 1861-1888 

Newspaper clipping containing article, “Jefferson Davis on Gen’l Robert E. Lee.”, [date unknown] 

Scope and Content

From a Jackson, MS newspaper.

Newspaper page with article, “Jeff Davis’ Shackles. How the Confederate President was Put in Chains—A Most Affecting Scene- The Shame of the Republic-An Old Story that Makes the Blood Boil.”, [1866] 

Scope and Content

From Columbus, Ga.

Newspaper clipping with article, “Holt.”, [June 1869] 

Scope and Content

Discharge of Hospital Steward Tonry “from the service of the United States for marrying the daughter of the murdered Mrs. Surratt.” The article accuses Judge-Advocate-General Holt as being the mastermind for this “contemptible order.”

Newspaper page containing article, “Hayes in Atlanta. His Sensible Speech at the Capital of Georgia.”, 29 September 1877 

Scope and Content

Unidentified paper.

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Defense After Confession.”, [1880] 

Scope and Content

Charge of perjury against Mr. Garfield.

Newspaper page from The New York Daily News, 25 July 1861 

Scope and Content

Contains information regarding the Battle of First Bull Run, among other war information.

Newspaper clipping with article entitled, “Gen. Robert E. Lee. A Great English General’s Opinion of Him- Gen. Garnet Wolselev’s Visit to Confederate Headquarters in 1862.”, [date unknown] 

Newspaper page from The Republican, St. Louis, containing article, “Lessons of the Census. Effect of the Civil War Upon Populations North and South. Increase of Blacks in the North…”, 15 September 1871 

Newspaper page from unidentified paper containing several articles, 8 March 1875 

Scope and Content

One in particular which is marked is entitled, “Sherman as a Friend of the South.”

Newspaper page from the Vicksburg Daily Herald containing article, “’Secession Secrets.’ Hon. Jefferson Davis Replies to Judge Jere Black.”, 1 September 1883 

Newspaper page from The Daily Picayune, 8 May 1887 

Scope and Content

Contains lengthy article, “Gen. Beauregard. Makes Another Statement Concerning the Battle of Shiloh. With Reference to Replies of Hon. Jefferson Davis and Col. Wm. Preston Johnston.”

Newspaper page from The Times-Democrat, 14 February 1888 

Scope and Content

Contains lengthy article, “Cavalry Reunion. Confederate Veterans Meet and Organize.”

Newspaper page from The Times-Democrat with notated articles, 16 May 1888 

Scope and Content

One article entitled “Port Items. With Latest Marine and Shipping Intelligence” and the other entitled “Gen. Wirt Adams. A Glowing and Deserved Tribute to the Gallant Soldier by a Fellow-Cavalryman.”

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