The University of Mississippi
Landscape Services Department

Willow Oak


Willow Oak (Quercus phellos) is a large tree, growing up to 120 feet tall. Its trunk can be several feet wide.

This oak looks different from other oaks because of its leaves. Instead of having wide leaves with lobes, Willow Oak has many slender leaves like a willow. Leaves are green and up to five inches long, but only about an inch wide. You can tell its an oak and not a willow, because the leaves do not have teeth, and because there is a tiny bristle (like a hair) at the tip. Willow Oak leaves turn pale yellow in the Fall.

Willow Oaks have two different flowers, male and female. The male flowers are easiest to recognize, because they are long yellowish-green catkins which hang down.

The fruit of this tree, like all oaks, is an acorn. Willow Oak acorns are about 1/2 inch long, with a greenish-brown saucer.

The bark of this tree is grayish-brown and older trees have furrows (deep wrinkles).





 

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