The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Dr. Lucien Cremaldi (Chair)

[Photo of Dr. Lucien Cremaldi]

Office: 108 Lewis Hall
Email: cremaldi@phy.olemiss.edu
Phone: (662) 915-5311

Degrees Earned

  • Ph.D., 1983, Northwestern University

Experience

  • Research Associate, University of Colorado, 1983-88
  • Visiting Researcher, Fermilab, 1978-
  • Assistant Professor, University of Mississippi, 1988-94
  • Associate Professor, University of Mississippi, 1994-2001
  • Professor, University of Mississippi, 2001-present

Memberships

  • American Physical Society
  • American Association of Physics Teachers.
  • IEEE

Research Interests

I have been involved for many years in studying the properties of heavy quarks. In 1988 I worked with an international group of physicists at Fermilab, then the highest energy accelerator in the world, to produce some of the most precise measurements on charmed particles ever made. Many of the vertex reconstruction techniques pioneered there are being used today. To analyze the large quantities of data, which we produced, our group successfully built and operated one of the first large parallel processing UNIX computing farms, which are commonly used in high energy physics and other fields of research these days.

In 2000 we began studying B-mesons and CP violation at the SLAC B factory. Measurements from this experiment firmly associated CP violating effects with the weak phases in the CKM matrix. Many high statistics B-meson branching fractions, Dalitz plot analyses, rare decays, and measurements of CKM elements are still being performed with the data.

In 2009 I began experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider in CERN when 7 TeV collisions were realized. In the 20 year lead-up to the LHC I worked on the CMS Pixel Detector and the CMS Hadron Calorimeter. Today we are studying QCD jet topologies, top quarks, and Bs mesons in this first rush of data. In the coming years scientists at the LHC will search for the HIggs boson and Supersymmetry, both having the potential of radically changing our view of the Standard Model.