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TIMELINE

On This Day in Mississippi Literary History

September

Sept. 1

1927: Actor and screenwriter Wyatt Cooper was born in Quitman, Mississippi.

Sept. 2

1912: Historian Aubrey C. Land was born in Panola County, Mississippi.

1939: Novelist and poet Chester L. Sullivan was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

2005: Novelist John Grisham and his wife, Renee, announced they were setting up a relief fund and personally donating $5 million for rebuilding along the Mississippi Gulf Coast after the devastating damage caused by Hurricane Katrina.

Sept. 3

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Sept. 4

1908: Novelist, poet, and essay writer Richard Wright was born in Roxie, Mississippi, a small community near Natchez.

1920: Cookbook writer Craig Claiborne was born in Sunflower, Mississippi.

Sept. 5

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Sept. 6

1930: William Faulkner published “Thrift” in the Saturday Evening Post.

1956: Novelist and historian Shelby Foote married Gwyn Rainer.

Sept. 7

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Sept. 8

1908: Historian Nash K. Burger was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

1910: Christian minister W. Earl Waldrop was born in Mount Olive, Mississippi.

1919: Medical physiologist Arthur C. Guyton was born in Oxford, Mississippi.

1926: Baptist minister and theologian Joe H. Cothen was born in Poplarville, Mississippi.

Sept. 9

1909: English professor Walton Richard Patrick was born in Collins, Mississippi.

1995: Jamie L. Whitten, U.S. Congressman and author of That We May Live, died of complications of chronic cardiac and kidney disease with acute respiratory distress in Oxford, Mississippi.

2001: Band of Brothers, a ten-part television miniseries based on a book by Stephen E. Ambrose about a U.S. Army unit in World War II, premiered on HBO.

Sept. 10

1907: Journalist and statesman Ralph Hilton was born in Mendenhall, Mississippi.

1916: Psychiatrist Harley Cecil Shands was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

1925: William Faulkner published “Country Mice” in the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

1928: Missionary Peggy Billings was born in McComb, Mississippi.

1946: Kay Pritchett, professor of Spanish language and literature, was born in Greenville, Mississippi.

2001: The motion picture Big Bad Love, based on the short story collection by Larry Brown, premiered at the Toronto Film Festival in Canada.

Sept. 11

1927: Presbyterian minister Andrew Albert Jumper was born in Marks, Mississippi.

1940: Business historian Thomas K. McCraw was born in Corinth, Mississippi.

1956: William Faulkner went to Washington for four days as the chairman of the Writers’Group, People-to-People Program.

Sept. 12

1931: Political scientist Matthew Holden, Jr., was born in Mound Bayou, Mississippi.

1937: Economist Jerolyn R. Lyle was born in Meridian, Mississippi.

1946: Fashion designer Paula Janice Johnson was born in Biloxi, Mississippi.

1951: William Faulkner and his wife Estelle drove their daughter Jill to Wellesley, Massachusetts, where she would enter Pine Manor Junior College.

1989: William Miller, Democratic doorkeeper for the U.S. House of Representatives from 1947 to 1976, died in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Sept. 13

1907: Theologian William F. Orr was born in Corinth, Mississippi.

1919: The story “They Grind Exceedingly Small” by Ben Ames Williams appeared in the Saturday Evening Post.

1939: Larry Speakes, former journalist and deputy press secretary for U.S. President Ronald Reagan from 1981-1987, was born in Cleveland, Mississippi.

1943: Novelist Mildred D. Taylor was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

Sept. 14

1899: Presbyterian minister William Earl Crane was born in Yazoo City, Mississippi.

1910: Music composer and writer Lehman Engel was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

1945: Editor, journalist and photographer James Dickerson was born in Greenwood, Mississippi.

1957: Software developer and business professor H. Jeff Smith was born in Starkville, Mississippi.

1982: Music composer and writer Lehman Engel died of cancer in New York City.

2000: Playwright and poet Beah Richards died of emphysema in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Sept. 15

1928: Methodist minister Perry Tanksley was born near Lorman, Mississippi.

1940: Writer and civil rights activist Anne Moody, author of Coming of Age in Mississippi, was born in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.

1946: Science fiction and fantasy writer Howard Waldrop was born in Houston, Mississippi.

Sept. 16

1899: English professor Richmond Pugh Bond was born in Magnolia, Mississippi.

1954: FBI officials interviewed Richard Wright in Paris about his relationship to the Communist Party when he went to renew his passport.

Sept. 17

1825: Lawyer, Congressman, and future Supreme Court justice L. Q. C. Lamar was born in Putnam County, Georgia.

1904: Baptist minister and theologian C. E. Autrey was born in Columbus, Mississippi.

1910: Zoology professor Osmond P. Breland was born in Decatur, Mississippi.

1934: Classics professor E. Otha Wingo was born in Booneville, Mississippi.

1943: Environmental engineer Harry M. Freeman was born in Meridian, Mississippi.

1946: Legal historian Walter F. Pratt, Jr. was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

1989: Jazz musician Milt Hinton performed at the White House with the Benny Carter All-Star Quartet.

Sept. 18

1922: Newspaper columnist George Thatcher was born in Gulfport, Mississippi.

1933: English professor, fiction writer, and poet Kenneth Holditch was born in Ecru, Mississippi.

Sept. 19

1941: Social work professor Thomas D. Watts was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

1947: Etiquette instructor and consultant Joan M. Coles was born in Houston, Mississippi.

Sept. 20

1918: William Faulkner was posted to the School of Military Aeronautics in Toronto after his entry into the Canadian Royal Air Force in July.

1925: Freelance artist and writer Polly Bolian was born in Mississippi.

1937: Professor of Old Testament studies J. Maxwell Miller was born in Kosciusko, Mississippi.

1973: The governor of Illinois proclaimed “Naomi Sims Day” in honor of fashion model Naomi Sims, who was born in Oxford, Mississippi.

Sept. 21

1779: After joining France in alliance against the British, Spain defeated British forces at Baton Rouge and took control of the British outpost at Natchez, later strengthening Spain’s post-war claims to its former Florida possessions.

1931: William Faulkner published These 13, a short story collection.

1999: Mystery writer Neil McGaughey died in Prentiss, Mississippi, at the age of 47.

Sept. 22

1790: Southwestern humorist Augustus Baldwin Longstreet was born in Augusta, Georgia.

1902: William Faulkner’s family moved to Oxford, Mississippi, just three days prior to his fifth birthday.

1905: Journalist and editor George W. Healy, Jr., was born in Natchez, Mississippi.

1978: Baptist theologian Gaines Stanley Dobbins died.

Sept. 23

1867: Folklorist John Alan Lomax was born in Goodman, Mississippi.

1937: Eudora Welty’s story “A Memory” was accepted for publication by the Southern Review. It was slightly revised for a later publication in A Curtain of Green.

1937: Tennessee Williams arrived in Iowa City to finish his undergraduate degree at the University of Iowa.

1943: Eudora Welty’s The Wide Net and Other Stories was published by Harcourt, Brace and Company, New York.

1993: Theologian William F. Orr died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Sept. 24

1901: Novelist John Faulkner, brother of William Faulkner, was born in Ripley, Mississippi.

1936: Puppeteer and filmmaker Jim Henson, creator of the “Muppets,” was born in Greenville, Mississippi.

1937: Journalism professor A. Edward Foote was born in Burnsville, Mississippi.

1969: A Sweet Devouring by Eudora Welty wais published by Albondocani Press, New York.

Sept. 25

1897: William Cuthbert Faulkner was born in New Albany, Mississippi.

1899: Murry C. Falkner, brother of John and William Faulkner, was born in Ripley, Mississippi.

1932: Historian William N. Still, Jr., was born in Columbus, Mississippi.

1933: Presbyterian minister and religion professor Julius W. Melton, Jr., was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

Sept. 26

1902: English professor Clyde Samuel Kilby was born in Johnson City, Tennessee.

1923: Political scientist William C. Havard, Jr., was born in Canton, Mississippi.

1928: Writer Joan Williams was born.

1948: Historian Patrick J. Geary was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

1951: Journalist and true-crime writer Jonathan Coleman was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

Sept. 27

1830: In the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, the Choctaw ceded all of their lands east of the Mississippi River and agreed to move to Oklahoma.

1890: Novelist Cid Ricketts Sumner was born in Brookhaven, Mississippi.

1909: English professor Calvin S. Brown was born in Oxford, Mississippi.

1925: William Faulkner published “Yo Ho and Two Bottles of Rum” in the New Orleans Times Picayune.

1948: Intruder in the Dust, a novel by William Faulkner, was published by Random House.

1951: Requiem for a Nun, a novel by William Faulkner, was published by Random House.

Sept. 28

1923: Poet Besmilr Brigham was born in Pace, Mississippi.

1926: Country comedian Jerry Clower was born in Liberty, Mississippi.

1953: Educator Beverly Ruthven was born in Jackson, Mississippi.

1990: Educator and writer Chester E. Swor died in Jackson, Mississippi.

Sept. 29

1926: Missionary, English instructor, and free-lance writer Jo Carr was born in Greenville, Mississippi.

1934: William Faulkner published “Ambuscade” in the Saturday Evening Post.

1959: William Faulkner went to Denver, Colorado, for a four-day UNESCO conference.

Sept. 30

1864: Southwestern humorist Joseph Glover Baldwin died in California as the result of an operation undertaken to prevent lockjaw.

1958: Country music singer-songwriter Marty Stuart was born in Philadelphia, Mississippi.

1962: James Meredith arrived in Oxford to become the first black student to enroll at the University of Mississippi. Overnight riots protesting his integration which left two people dead and many others injured led President John F. Kennedy to order 20,000 federal troops to the area to restore and maintain order.

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