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The Photo Gallery
Room 2: The Balloon is Launched
 
Please note:  These images are copyrighted.  They are placed here for your viewing enjoyment.
Contact us if you have some other use planned for them.
 
 Just scroll down, or you can click on one of the choices in the table to view a photo.
1- Launch 

2 - Watching 

3 - Balloon and launch train

4 - Still rising 

5 - Hailstone 

6 - Mammatus cloud

 
 


 

Seconds after balloon launch.  Texas, 1994.
Just off the surface, the balloon rises at about 5 meters per second (about 16 feet per second).  Note that the radiosonde swings, but the electric field meter stays horizontal by virtue of its rigging.  The crew scrambles to their post-launch tasks.
 
 


 

 Watching for 'in cloud'.  Texas, 1994.
If conditions allow, one crew member (here, Megan Maddox) watches the balloon until it enters the cloud.  Shown in the background is the balloon truck used to transport the inflated balloons, instruments, equipment, and helium.  The launch tube is being readied for the next balloon inflation on the far left.
 
 


 

Balloon and launch train, rising toward the cloud.  Over Texas, 1994.

 


 

A balloon and its launch train, still rising.  Over Texas, 1994.
 
 
 


 
                Hailstone, approximately 2.5 inches in diameter.  Texas, 1994.
This hailstone was collected by Tom Marshall during ballooning operations.
It has a rounded disk shape, and the core is denser, almost clear ice.
 
 
 


 
            NSSL1 under a mammatus cloud.  Texas, 1994.
Mammatiform clouds like this are usually found beneath the anvil of
a thunderstorm or in the late stages of the storm.
 

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Please note:  These images are copyrighted.  They are placed here for your viewing enjoyment.
Contact us if you have some other use planned for them.
Last update 11 January 2000. Maribeth Stolzenburg  (mstolzen@phy.olemiss.edu)
 Copyright © 2000 The University of Mississippi. All rights reserved.